Wine Growing Regions Of France

Umbrella Kniffin System for Growing Grapes

David Handley: I'm David Handley, with theUniversity of Maine Cooperative Extension, and we're here to talk about pruning grapes.Very simple system for farnorthern production. Here in Maine, we need to protect the vinesas best we can through the winter, but at the same time try to get enough light andexposure to the canes that we're going to get good fruit set, and good fruit quality. One of the systems you can use for labruscatype or concord type grapes, which are the ones that do best here in Maine, which isthe umbrella kniffin. As opposed to the four arm kniffin, the umbrella kniffin puts allof its canes up at the top, or the first year

growth that's going to fruit. What we're talking about with cane growthhere is one yearold growth that has a chocolate brown color, and nice smooth bark with budson it. We're going to be saving four canes, plus the permanent trunk, to give us all ofour fruiting structure. Everything else is going to be coming off of here, and that includesanything that fruited last year. You can tell the two yearold canes, or thecanes that fruited last year, because they'll be thicker, and they'll have gray, peelingbark. All of these are going to come off, and we're going to save the one yearold canewith the chocolate brown color, and the smooth

bark. The first step in pruning is to look at ourpermanent trunk and remove all of the two yearold growth, the growth that fruited lastyear, saving a few canes that we'll be using for fruiting this year. Our first step isto cut some of these off, looking at that older bark there. We just cut that out, getit right out of there. This will open up the planting, and that twoyearold wood is not going to fruit. Unless we take it out, we'll find that our fruitingwood gets further and further away from the trunk. Part of the reason we're pruning isto keep that fruiting wood concentrated right

near the trunk. With the umbrella kniffin, which is what we'repruning to here, we're only going to maintain four of those fruiting canes. We want themall concentrated near the top of the trunk, or the top wire on our twowire trellis. We'regoing to take each of the canes that remain behind. As you can see here, here's my nicefruiting cane, smooth bark. All these are buds that are going to breakand give us long, green shoots that will have bunches of grapes on them. We're going todrape them over the top wire, and then we're going to attach them to the bottom wire, togive you that kind of quot;umbrellaquot; look, thus

the name of the system called the quot;umbrellakniffin.quot; Then we're going to cut off the ends of thecanes, so that there's only about 10 buds on each one. We just count those from thetrunk. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. If I need to leave one ortwo on there to make it reach the bottom wire, that's fine. I'll just go to where I can attachthis to the bottom wire, like that. I need two for the other side, to completeour umbrella. You can see this leaves me with several other fruiting canes, and I need tosave some of those as well, but they don't need to be as long. What I'm calling theseare quot;renewal spurs,quot; because we need the buds

from these shoots to come out and give uscane that we'll be able to put up on the wire next year. For every fruiting cane that I'm leaving behind,I also need to cut some renewal cane, or renewal spurs, to provide us with fruiting wood fornext year. I just cut these back to one or two buds, and if they're not where I wantthem I can cut them off completely. But for every fruiting cane, I need to leave at leastone renewal spur. I tend to leave a couple of extra renewalspurs here in Maine, because I'm very sensitive to the fact that I'm likely to get winterinjury almost every year.

What sort of wine region is the LanguedocRoussillon

As you very well know the LanguedocRoussillon is not only largest winemaking region in the world with just under 300,000 hectaires, but it's also oldest winemaking region in France, going back 2600 years. It's been a very tumultuous history with lots of ups and downs, and quality variations. To be veryhonest with you the quality that put the LanguedocRoussillon

on the international scene is only a thirty year old history. So it's very very young. Imagine three ecosystems meeting: we have the sea, we have the massif central being the oldest mountains, we have the young mountains of the Pyrenees. We have all these terroirs, a mish mash of terroirs. Makes it extremely difficult to describe. I guess the common factor is probably the fact that it's a Mediterranean climate.

Therefore we tend to have wines with a bit more alcohol, more ripeness, a sense of fruitiness that others probably don't have. Tanninsé Most of the time they tend to be a bit softer as well. maybe a bit less acidic than other regions. The Languedoc Roussillon is also for me like an intermediate stage.

Take Grenache for example. Grenache in the Southern Rhone is a is very ripe and juicy, meaty, alcoholic.a ton of pleasure you get those wines like Gigondas, Rasteau, Chateauneuf du Pape, but then if you go extreme opposite, near the Spanish border, it goes into a real minerality an austere profile, and I guess the Languedoc Roussillon is really this. how should I put ité variation of

styles. So many many different wines can be found in Languedoc Roussillon.

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