Wine Grapes For Sale Pennsylvania

Growing Grapes in Texas Jim Kamas Central Texas Gardener

I love Tait Moring's sense ofgardening style. Thanks so much for opening your gates for us. Right now we're going to talk aboutgrowing grapes. One of the hottest topics here in Texas because of all the wineries. We have Jim Kamas with us. It's great to have you back on theprogram. Welcome. Thanks, Tom, I appreciate it. Welcome back to Central Texas Gardener. You've just published a great new bookGrowing Grapes in Texas.

Congratulations on that! Thanks a lot. It took a couple years to get done, but I'm I'm pretty happy with it. Well you know, like I said, it's a hottopic. A lot of people are very interested in growing grapes in their backyard. Maybe one ofthose famous table grapes, like Concord or something like that. Well Concord ispretty tough to grow here. Concord likes acid soils which we don'thave. And it's much more adapted a cooler climates. If you wanted to grow Fredonia or some of the other lebrusca types, they'll work, but

Concord is a pretty tough one to grow here. Ok, well your book is filled with tips aboutvarieties and things like that. Let's focus on that home grower. You know , I know for example I go out to hillcountry every now and again to go to Fredericksburg, places around there. And I see wineries springing up like mushrooms now. And it kinda makes me wanna grow grapeshere in town. What does a home gardner need to know to get startedé Well if you're a homeowner and you want to grow enough vines to produce a little bit of wine

my advice is plant what you like. If you're planting a commercial vineyards we're going to have a very different discussion. But if you like Merlot, plant Merlot. If you like Syrah, plant Syrah. For smallscale, you have no big economicinvestment, so plant what you like and go with that. Yeah okay, that makes sense. In terms of the space needs, the sun,

all those kinds of things, grapes arerather particular and disease prone. Yes. So let's give people an idea of whatthe basics are that they would need to have any kind of success. Sure. Commercially our rows are spaced nine to ten feet apart, but in the backyard if you are maintaining the row centers with alawnmower or something, you can place the rows as close as six feet apart.And you can also go as tight as five to six feet between vines. You can put a lot of vines in arelatively small space.

So small space is OK. When we talk about the rows, we are talking about providing structures on which the the vines can grow and supportthemselves. Yes, a lot of times in California you'll see these free standing vines that are called head pruned vines. They don't do very well here because we need to keep our vines up off the ground because it rains here duringthe summer and they are very disease prone as you mentioned.

New Law Is Changing Pennsylvania Wine Sales

FINALLY PENNSYLVANIA IS CHANGING THE WAY IT SELLS BOOZE. NEW LAW NOW IN EFFECT ALLOWS ROUGHLY 11,000 BUSINESSES THAT SELL BEER TO GO, TO APPLY FOR PERMISSION TO SELL TAKEOUT WINE.

CASINOS CAN NOW APPLY TO SELL LIQUOR DURING OVERNIGHT HOURS, AND WINERIES AND OTHER STATES CAN SHIP DIRECTLY TO PENNSYLVANIA CUSTOMERS. THE LIQUOR CONTROL BOARD IS.

Tasting Cotton Candy Grapes Fruity Fruits

Greetings my lovelies! Hi, it's Emmy. Welcome back to another Fruity Fruits! I haven't done one of these episodes in a long time because I haven't found any good new fruits; but today, I have this: do you see thisé do you see thisé Cotton Candy grapes — whaté! So I've gotten several requests for these guys and I have never seen them before until — today! So, apparently these are grapes that taste like cotton candy, or candy floss. People! Reallyé They are sustainably grown; they are nonGMO — which is great, because the last thing I want to eat is some genetically modified organism. Righté I have yet to try these, but in the grocery store my sons proceeded to eat about a third of this box, so. it mustbe pretty good; but neither one of my

kids have actually ever had cotton candy, so they can't attest to whether or not it tastes like cotton candy or not; but I have, so, I shall do it for you. All right! And they are made by the Grapery people. Product of USA. All right! So let's give 'em a taste! Whoa! They are giant, first of all. They're huge, huge grapes. All right! Moment of truth! (Itadakimasu!)

Hm. Umm! And that's what it looks like on the inside. It's a seedless grape; quite sweet and juicy, just like a Thompson seedless grape, but the skin is not at all tart; to me you taste more of the cotton candy flavor after you eat the grape — it's kind of like at the end. And it does taste like cotton candy. Sweet, and kind of syrupy, but, initially, all I taste is grape — from the beginning. And those are the Cotton Candy grapes and they're grown by the Grapery Company. And they're pretty good.

So let me know in the comments below what your favorite grape preparation is: do you like them suspended in jello; do you like them frozen; do you like them just whole; do you like 'em juiced; let me know in the comments below. Don't forget to subscribe, quot;like,quot; and comment and I hope you guys enjoyed that; I hope you guys learned something; and I shall see you in my next tutorial! Tootaloo! Take care! Bye! So which shall I try firsté Hmmmé Let's try cheddar first. Here's the back. The front. Moon Cheese!

Leave a Reply