Willow Tree Grapes Of Wrath

Prairie Yard Garden Growing Grapes

(gentle music) Prairie Yard Garden is a production of the University of Minnesota Morris in cooperation with Pioneer Public Television. Closed captioning is provided by Mark and Margaret YackelJuleen in honor of Shalom Hill Farm, a nonprofit rural education retreat center in a beautiful

prairie setting near Windom in southwestern Minnesota. Shalom Hill Farm, shalomhill Did you hear that a new crop is appearing on the prairieé Growing grapes has created an interest among a few individuals who like the challenge of adapting it to our region. Join me on Prairie Yard Garden as we visit a vineyard to learn about the process and challenges

of growing grapes on the prairie. (soft lighthearted music) A new crop has appeared on the prairie: growing grapes And today I have Florian Ledermann with me who's been involved with the process for the last four to five years. Florian welcome to the show and tell me, how did you get interested in growing grapesé ^We got interested actually at the

University of Morris's Horticultural Night. We sat down in a tent and learned that the university just released four new varieties of grapes that are actually coldhardy. And before that, I always kind of figured grapes were the crop that just kind of came up and never really bore and died every winter and died back. So that's what spiked our interest.

And so that very nextspring, we bought five. And they survived and I did a little more research and decided to go with an acre. And a year later, another acre so we ended up with 1,350 vines as a result of that little adventure in Morris. Larry That's interesting. 1,300 vines, how long does it take you

to put all those in the groundé Florian We used family labor. (Florian laughs) So we had, it took us, I think probably when we were planting, it took us about threedays to put one acre in. That would be for the planting. The posts and the trellis system and everything

Prairie Musicians LinesNotes

playing in bright rhythm recitingOut of bed and chicken skin feet Hit freezing wooden floor. I'm half awake and sleepy seeds Still cling to the cornersof stony, dreamy eyes. I'm running slowmo on a gogo, Cocold Minnesota Novembermorning, Focusing with chilly will onthe coffee cooker to pour out,

From a pouting spout, a meanslow stream of steaming (woman) This program isfunded by the Minnesota Arts and CulturalHeritage Fund and by the membersof Prairie Public. playing in bright rhythm ♪♪ reciting On 20th, thehigh school boys track team Runs on the sidewalk,

Tanned and muscledlike a squad of Adoni. Their determination rollsoff stoic brows, Ten miles, that's all. In close pursuit isthe girl on the bike. She follows a few yards behindthese gazelle. She peddles effortlessly,a smile as broad As the brimon her straw garden hat. The girl grins for sunshine,for summer, for bicycles,

For following the high schoolboys track team. Before my eyes, the bikebecomes a white stallion, And the girl wears a hunter'stunic with bow and arrows Slung over her marble left arm. Hunting these, quot;the easy prey.quot; They will wear down, they run instraight lines in the flats. No water, they will need to stopand rest in shade. She will ride up and dismount,they cannot run.

She pulls backthe gut of the bow, piercing their glistening skinwith her eyes. Hi, my name is Terrie Manno andI am originally from California and I moved to Moorhead,Minnesota, actually about 26 years ago,to take the position as Piano Professor at MinnesotaState University Moorhead. I'm also a performing pianist and Kevin and I had beencolleagues for years,

but it was only recently that wefinally decided we were going to put together our projects,and that is somehow to combine his wonderful inventive,creative poetry with my music. His suggestion was that I shouldcompose music to it and I was a little intimidatedactually because I haven't composed music sinceI was a student in college. I talked with him aboutwhat the mood is, what kind of emotion is behindit, and then I write music

Episode 2 Reaping the Whirlwind

WIND BLOWING Woody Guthrie:♪ ON THE 14th DAY OF APRIL ♪ ♪ OF 1935 ♪ ♪ THERE STRUCK THE WORSTOF DUST STORMS ♪ ♪ THAT EVER FILLED THE SKY ♪ ♪ YOU COULD SEETHAT DUST STORM COMING ♪ ♪ THE CLOUD LOOKEDDEATHLIKE BLACK ♪ ♪ AND THROUGHOUR MIGHTY NATION ♪

♪ IT LEFT A DREADFUL TRACK ♪ Donald Worster: WE HAVE MANYWORDS FOR WHAT'S UNDER OUR FEET. THE GOOD EARTHWE LIKE TOTALK ABOUT THE GOOD EARTH AND PICK IT UP ANDSMELL IT AND TASTE IT. THIS IS THE SOIL OF OURPRODUCTIVITY, OUR PROSPERITY. BUT WHEN IT'S LOOSEAND BLOWING AND IT'S GETTINGINTO YOUR ATTIC AND IT'S COVERING YOUR LAUNDRYON THE CLOTHES LINE, IT'S DIRT,

OR WHEN YOU'REBREATHING IT, IT'S DUST. I THINK WE ALL REALIZETHAT WHERE DIRT BELONGS IS UNDER OUR FEET,NOT UP IN THE AIR. Wayne Lewis: WE MADESO MUCH MONEY AT RAISING WHEATIN THE LATE TWENTIES THAT WE BROKE EVERYTHING OUTTO RAISE MORE WHEAT. THEN THE CLIMATE CHANGEDAND THE DEPRESSION CAME ALONG, AND THE WHEATWASN'T WORTH MUCH.

BUT WE STILL HADTHE LAND BROKEN OUT. WE WERE JUST TOO SELFISH, AND WEWERE TRYING TO MAKE MONEY AND GET RICH QUICKOFF OF THE WHEAT, AND IT DIDN'T WORK OUT. Pamela RineyKehrberg:THIS IS ONE OF THE WORST SUSTAINED ENVIRONMENTALDISASTERS IN AMERICAN HISTORY. IT'S NOT SOMETHING THATHAPPENS IN JUST ONE YEAR. IT'S NOT SOMETHING THATJUST LASTS FOR 3 OR 4 YEARS.

IT'S A DECADE. BECAUSE OF THE COMBINATIONOF EXTREME DROUGHT AND EXTREME HIGH TEMPERATURES, THIS IS THE WORST10YEAR PERIOD IN RECORDED HISTORYON THE PLAINS. Guthrie: ♪ WE SAWOUTSIDE OUR WINDOW ♪ ♪ WHERE WHEAT FIELDSTHEY HAD GROWN ♪ ♪ WAS NOW A RIPPLING OCEAN ♪

♪ OF DUSTTHE WIND HAD BLOWN ♪ Narrator: IN THE SUMMER OF 1935, AT HER HOMESTEAD INTHE OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE, CAROLINE HENDERSON,A FARM WIFE AND WRITER, SAT DOWN AND COMPOSED A LETTER TO THE SECRETARY OFAGRICULTURE, HENRY WALLACE, TO LET HIM KNOW WHATSHE, HER HUSBAND, AND SO MANY OF HER NEIGHBORSWERE GOING THROUGH.

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