How To You Grow Seedless Grapes

Caring for Young Grape Vines

My name is David Handley, I'm with the Universityof Maine Cooperative Extension, and we're here to talk about how to prune and traina young grapevine. This is a vine that was planted last spring. We got it from a dormantplant, or rooted cutting, and you can see the original part of the planting right here.This is what we got from the nursery, with a good root system under it. We planted it,and we had a bud break and some vine growth. This is last year's growth right here. Thiswas a green shoot. Typically, you may get more than one shoot developing. You may haveseveral buds on here. We want to prune this back to one strong vine, your strongest one.We're going to arrange for that to be tied

up to a trellis, because this particular vineis what's going to become our permanent trunk, or the permanent part of the plant that'sgoing to be with us for the life of the planting. We want to make sure it's the strongest ofthe vines that we can choose from. Any other one that developed that's very weak, we canjust cut that out, select our best one. The time of year to make these cuts are whenthe canes are dormant, and this is going to be really any time after the new year, untilthey bud out in late March, early April. We hope in the first year that we get enoughgood growth that we can tie it to the lower trellis wire.Typically here in Maine, we're going to be

pruning to either a four arm kniffin trainingsystem, or an umbrella kniffin training system. Those trellises consist of two wires, oneset at about two and a half feet, and a second wire set at about five feet.We hope in the first year that we're going to get enough good growth to reach at leastthe bottom wire, but in order to make sure it's growing straight, you can see we supportedthis with a small bamboo pole. Any kind of planting stake will work, and we just tiethat vine up as it grows, rather than let it grow along the ground where it can getrot problems, and not develop a nice straight growth like we want. We tie it up, just likeyou'd tie up a beef steak tomato, get the

growth that you want.As I said, we've got pretty good buds here, reaching up to the first wire. You can seethat I actually make it to the top wire, but you can see the growth up here is very scrawnyand spindly, and isn't really going to lead to a good, strong trunk. I'd rather actuallystart new growth for reaching to this top wire for next year.What that means is that I'm actually going to cut this off here, rather low, to try toget this bud here to break and give me a much stronger shoot to develop my trunk to thetop wire next year. I can just take that there, and then, instead of using the bamboo polethis year, I can just tie it to the wire.

This bud will hopefully break, and give mea good, strong shoot, that I'm going to reach the second wire next year. Of course, thesebuds lower down will also break, and if this one happens to be weak, I may select one ofthese. But, if this bud does turn out to be a strong shoot, I'll be cutting these offnext winter and getting my single trunk back up to the top wire.Next year, when this does reach the top wire, eventually what we'll be doing is taking oneyear old cane, and either draping it over this top wire and connecting it to the bottomwire in an umbrella kniffin, or we'll be taking one cane at the top wire on each side, andone cane at the bottom wire on each side,

to create four arms of one year old growth,for a four\uc0\u8209 arm kniffin system. Both systems work pretty well for concretetype grapes here in a cold climate like Maine.

How Can There Be Seedless Grapes

Hi, I'm Josh Clark. And I'm wondering have youever been to a grocery store, picked up some seedlessgrapes, eaten them, and then just stopped dead inyour tracks and thought, wait a minute, how can somethingthat needs seeds to reproduce be seedless. These grapesshouldn't even exist.

I mean, yes these seedlessgrapes can be here. But what about its childrené I'm here to answer thisexistential question for you. It turns out that mostof the fruit we eat are clones of other fruit. Most fruits is propagatedincluding seedless grapes, through cuttings. So they don't needto have seeds.

Rather than following thetraditional angiosperm method of reproduction, whichmeans producing seeds, and fruit to cover those things. So to produce a newbunch of seedless grapes, a whole new plant, you take acutting from an existing vine. You dip that cuttingin rooting hormone. And you put that cutting in alittle bit of nice warm soil. A little moisture andyou've got a new vine

that's going to producemore seedless grapes. They never have to produceseeds because they never have to reproduce. But where do the seedlessgrapes come from to begin withé Turns out somewherealong the line, somebody noticed some grapesthat didn't produce seeds well. And said, hey, thisis a genetic defect that I could really cash in on.

Let me just keeppropagating this one grape. So all the seedless grapestoday are descendants of clones of that originalfreak of nature seedless grape. Which you can thank the guywho figured that one out. And one last thing, theseedless grapes you eat actually do have seeds in them. They have thebeginning of seeds that due to that genetic mutationwe talked about, never

form the hard outershell, which means you never choke on a grape seed. You can thank that guy, whoeverhis name is, he was a good guy. If you like thistutorial, you're going to love all the tutorialson this YouTube channel. You can go ahead and subscribe. Maybe leave a nicelittle comment and just watchtutorials all day long.

The Fresh Grocer Green Seedless Grapes

FRANCHISE HISTORY. 10881 IS YOUR FINAL. FOR CBS 2 NEWS, I'M MARK MORGAN. HAVE A GREAT DAY. TASTE OF THE DAY. WE'RE GETTING BEAUTIFUL GREEN SEEDLESS GRAPES.

THEY LOOK GREAT. IN ABOUT TWO OR THREE MORE WEEKS THEY'LL GET A LITTLE MORE AMBER COLOR. WHICH MEANS THEY'LL BE SWEETER. RIGHT NOW THEY'RE NOT THAT BAD. SELECTION AND STORAGE IS VERY IMPORTANT OR ANYTHING IS NOT

GOING TO TASTE GOOD IF YOU DON'T STORE THEM RIGHT OR SELECT THEM RIGHT. LET'S TALK ABOUT SELECTION. WHEN YOU BUY THEM, NICE COLOR ALL THE WAY AROUND. THE MORE AMBER, THE BETTER THEY'LL BE.

STEMS NICE AND GREEN. GREENER THE STEM THE FRESHER THE GRAPES. WHEN YOU BRING THEM HOME, IN THE REFRIGERATOR RIGHT AWAY. THEY COME FROM CHILE THOUSAND MILES AWAY. BUY THEM, ENJOY THEM.

THIS IS A ROUNDER VARIETY. IN A LITTLE WHILE WE'LL GET THE SEEDLESS VARIETY.

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