How To Plant Red Seedless Grapes

Growing Grapes in Texas Jim Kamas Central Texas Gardener

I love Tait Moring's sense ofgardening style. Thanks so much for opening your gates for us. Right now we're going to talk aboutgrowing grapes. One of the hottest topics here in Texas because of all the wineries. We have Jim Kamas with us. It's great to have you back on theprogram. Welcome. Thanks, Tom, I appreciate it. Welcome back to Central Texas Gardener. You've just published a great new bookGrowing Grapes in Texas.

Congratulations on that! Thanks a lot. It took a couple years to get done, but I'm I'm pretty happy with it. Well you know, like I said, it's a hottopic. A lot of people are very interested in growing grapes in their backyard. Maybe one ofthose famous table grapes, like Concord or something like that. Well Concord ispretty tough to grow here. Concord likes acid soils which we don'thave. And it's much more adapted a cooler climates. If you wanted to grow Fredonia or some of the other lebrusca types, they'll work, but

Concord is a pretty tough one to grow here. Ok, well your book is filled with tips aboutvarieties and things like that. Let's focus on that home grower. You know , I know for example I go out to hillcountry every now and again to go to Fredericksburg, places around there. And I see wineries springing up like mushrooms now. And it kinda makes me wanna grow grapeshere in town. What does a home gardner need to know to get startedé Well if you're a homeowner and you want to grow enough vines to produce a little bit of wine

my advice is plant what you like. If you're planting a commercial vineyards we're going to have a very different discussion. But if you like Merlot, plant Merlot. If you like Syrah, plant Syrah. For smallscale, you have no big economicinvestment, so plant what you like and go with that. Yeah okay, that makes sense. In terms of the space needs, the sun,

all those kinds of things, grapes arerather particular and disease prone. Yes. So let's give people an idea of whatthe basics are that they would need to have any kind of success. Sure. Commercially our rows are spaced nine to ten feet apart, but in the backyard if you are maintaining the row centers with alawnmower or something, you can place the rows as close as six feet apart.And you can also go as tight as five to six feet between vines. You can put a lot of vines in arelatively small space.

So small space is OK. When we talk about the rows, we are talking about providing structures on which the the vines can grow and supportthemselves. Yes, a lot of times in California you'll see these free standing vines that are called head pruned vines. They don't do very well here because we need to keep our vines up off the ground because it rains here duringthe summer and they are very disease prone as you mentioned.

How Can There Be Seedless Grapes

Hi, I'm Josh Clark. And I'm wondering have youever been to a grocery store, picked up some seedlessgrapes, eaten them, and then just stopped dead inyour tracks and thought, wait a minute, how can somethingthat needs seeds to reproduce be seedless. These grapesshouldn't even exist.

I mean, yes these seedlessgrapes can be here. But what about its childrené I'm here to answer thisexistential question for you. It turns out that mostof the fruit we eat are clones of other fruit. Most fruits is propagatedincluding seedless grapes, through cuttings. So they don't needto have seeds.

Rather than following thetraditional angiosperm method of reproduction, whichmeans producing seeds, and fruit to cover those things. So to produce a newbunch of seedless grapes, a whole new plant, you take acutting from an existing vine. You dip that cuttingin rooting hormone. And you put that cutting in alittle bit of nice warm soil. A little moisture andyou've got a new vine

that's going to producemore seedless grapes. They never have to produceseeds because they never have to reproduce. But where do the seedlessgrapes come from to begin withé Turns out somewherealong the line, somebody noticed some grapesthat didn't produce seeds well. And said, hey, thisis a genetic defect that I could really cash in on.

Let me just keeppropagating this one grape. So all the seedless grapestoday are descendants of clones of that originalfreak of nature seedless grape. Which you can thank the guywho figured that one out. And one last thing, theseedless grapes you eat actually do have seeds in them. They have thebeginning of seeds that due to that genetic mutationwe talked about, never

form the hard outershell, which means you never choke on a grape seed. You can thank that guy, whoeverhis name is, he was a good guy. If you like thistutorial, you're going to love all the tutorialson this YouTube channel. You can go ahead and subscribe. Maybe leave a nicelittle comment and just watchtutorials all day long.

The Fresh Grocer Green Seedless Grapes

FRANCHISE HISTORY. 10881 IS YOUR FINAL. FOR CBS 2 NEWS, I'M MARK MORGAN. HAVE A GREAT DAY. TASTE OF THE DAY. WE'RE GETTING BEAUTIFUL GREEN SEEDLESS GRAPES.

THEY LOOK GREAT. IN ABOUT TWO OR THREE MORE WEEKS THEY'LL GET A LITTLE MORE AMBER COLOR. WHICH MEANS THEY'LL BE SWEETER. RIGHT NOW THEY'RE NOT THAT BAD. SELECTION AND STORAGE IS VERY IMPORTANT OR ANYTHING IS NOT

GOING TO TASTE GOOD IF YOU DON'T STORE THEM RIGHT OR SELECT THEM RIGHT. LET'S TALK ABOUT SELECTION. WHEN YOU BUY THEM, NICE COLOR ALL THE WAY AROUND. THE MORE AMBER, THE BETTER THEY'LL BE.

STEMS NICE AND GREEN. GREENER THE STEM THE FRESHER THE GRAPES. WHEN YOU BRING THEM HOME, IN THE REFRIGERATOR RIGHT AWAY. THEY COME FROM CHILE THOUSAND MILES AWAY. BUY THEM, ENJOY THEM.

THIS IS A ROUNDER VARIETY. IN A LITTLE WHILE WE'LL GET THE SEEDLESS VARIETY.

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