Grapes Plant Family

Umbrella Kniffin System for Growing Grapes

David Handley: I'm David Handley, with theUniversity of Maine Cooperative Extension, and we're here to talk about pruning grapes.Very simple system for farnorthern production. Here in Maine, we need to protect the vinesas best we can through the winter, but at the same time try to get enough light andexposure to the canes that we're going to get good fruit set, and good fruit quality. One of the systems you can use for labruscatype or concord type grapes, which are the ones that do best here in Maine, which isthe umbrella kniffin. As opposed to the four arm kniffin, the umbrella kniffin puts allof its canes up at the top, or the first year

growth that's going to fruit. What we're talking about with cane growthhere is one yearold growth that has a chocolate brown color, and nice smooth bark with budson it. We're going to be saving four canes, plus the permanent trunk, to give us all ofour fruiting structure. Everything else is going to be coming off of here, and that includesanything that fruited last year. You can tell the two yearold canes, or thecanes that fruited last year, because they'll be thicker, and they'll have gray, peelingbark. All of these are going to come off, and we're going to save the one yearold canewith the chocolate brown color, and the smooth

bark. The first step in pruning is to look at ourpermanent trunk and remove all of the two yearold growth, the growth that fruited lastyear, saving a few canes that we'll be using for fruiting this year. Our first step isto cut some of these off, looking at that older bark there. We just cut that out, getit right out of there. This will open up the planting, and that twoyearold wood is not going to fruit. Unless we take it out, we'll find that our fruitingwood gets further and further away from the trunk. Part of the reason we're pruning isto keep that fruiting wood concentrated right

near the trunk. With the umbrella kniffin, which is what we'repruning to here, we're only going to maintain four of those fruiting canes. We want themall concentrated near the top of the trunk, or the top wire on our twowire trellis. We'regoing to take each of the canes that remain behind. As you can see here, here's my nicefruiting cane, smooth bark. All these are buds that are going to breakand give us long, green shoots that will have bunches of grapes on them. We're going todrape them over the top wire, and then we're going to attach them to the bottom wire, togive you that kind of quot;umbrellaquot; look, thus

the name of the system called the quot;umbrellakniffin.quot; Then we're going to cut off the ends of thecanes, so that there's only about 10 buds on each one. We just count those from thetrunk. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. If I need to leave one ortwo on there to make it reach the bottom wire, that's fine. I'll just go to where I can attachthis to the bottom wire, like that. I need two for the other side, to completeour umbrella. You can see this leaves me with several other fruiting canes, and I need tosave some of those as well, but they don't need to be as long. What I'm calling theseare quot;renewal spurs,quot; because we need the buds

from these shoots to come out and give uscane that we'll be able to put up on the wire next year. For every fruiting cane that I'm leaving behind,I also need to cut some renewal cane, or renewal spurs, to provide us with fruiting wood fornext year. I just cut these back to one or two buds, and if they're not where I wantthem I can cut them off completely. But for every fruiting cane, I need to leave at leastone renewal spur. I tend to leave a couple of extra renewalspurs here in Maine, because I'm very sensitive to the fact that I'm likely to get winterinjury almost every year.

Growing Together Moldovas FamilyRun Et Cetera Winery

Hello everyone! We are here in southeastern Moldova, at the familyrun winery of Et Cetera. And, I have in my right hand, a Cabernet SauvignonRosé, and in my left hand, a traditional Moldovandish called Plăcintă. It's a phyllo dough pastry with cheese stuffedinside. I'm anxious to try it. I haven't triedit yet. The Et Cetera family is a rising star in theMoldovan wine scene

and we stopped by to see what was happening. So, we'll show you in just a second. Hope you enjoy! 🙂 It was a good morning at the Et Cetera wineryin Moldova. Welcoming signs were out. A hearty breakfast served. And the wood fires lit for a full day of traditional Moldovan cooking.

The Luchianov Family, who own and operatethe Et Cetera winery, are experts in making the traditional Moldovandish called Plăcintă. Layer upon layer of stretchy phyllo dough give this savory dish its flaky, crispy texture. A copious amount of cheese is added, followed by a few more layers. It is then baked, sliced,

and served. It goes remarkably well with Et Cetera'sRosé. Et Cetera's head chef and culinary wizardis Daniela Luchianov. From an incredible pumpkin soup to a bounty of baked goods, Daniela, along with her husband Igor, would ensure that we had a fantastic culinaryexperience.

The task of ensuring that Et Cetera's wineis of the highest quality lies with Igor's brother, and winemaker, Alex. From deciding on the right time to harvest, to giving tours of the winery, Alex, along with his wife Olga, are a key part of this growing, family winery. During our stay, Tricia and I would take partin a harvest.

With our scissors snapping away, bunches of ruby red Cabernet Sauvignon grapes, Merlot, and even a few local varietals, began to fill our buckets. After they were full, we returned to the winery for more fun, incredible food, and of course, lots of delicious Moldovanwine.

Grape Hyacinth Muscari armeniacum How to grow Grape Hyacinth

I love a patch of Grape Hyacinths. You cansee that they get their name from the color in the clusters of flowers on the little spikes.Actually the tops of these have been a little frost blasted, but they are still a wonderfuldisplay. Muscari armeniacum is the botanical name for this particular type of Grape Hyacinth.There are other species as well. There are some that give you a larger bloom, some tingedwith white, some are even in the hotter color frames, the pinks and the reds, yellows andorange. We may have one blooming down below. It is a Fall planted bulb. Plant these inthe Fall like you would a Crocus or a Daffodil and then what happens is it spends the Winterdormant and it comes up in early Spring and

gives you this great display of dark blueto purple flowers. Then after the flowers have died back the foliage still hangs around,it's continuing to gather nutrients and send sugars to the root bulb for flowering nextyear, to get it through the long Winter and for it to flower next year. I have some Muscarihere at the garden that are almost evergreen. Their leaves stayed around all Winter long.This is not one of them. This actually came up this Spring. The honey bees are workingit, it's fragrant. Its a wonderful, wonderful eyecatching contrast to the yellows and thewarmer colors of the Daffodils next to it. Muscari Grape Hyacinth are a carefree, veryeasily grown Spring bulb. Again, you plant

them in the Fall. No problem coming up. Youdo want to avoid wet, swampy soils and other than that, you're good to go. Not many thingswill mess with the Grape Hyacinth. I suppose that moles and voles may be a problem in someareas, but I haven't even had squirrels mess with ours. Muscari armeniacum.

Leave a Reply