Grape Vine Not Producing Grapes

Umbrella Kniffin System for Growing Grapes

David Handley: I'm David Handley, with theUniversity of Maine Cooperative Extension, and we're here to talk about pruning grapes.Very simple system for farnorthern production. Here in Maine, we need to protect the vinesas best we can through the winter, but at the same time try to get enough light andexposure to the canes that we're going to get good fruit set, and good fruit quality. One of the systems you can use for labruscatype or concord type grapes, which are the ones that do best here in Maine, which isthe umbrella kniffin. As opposed to the four arm kniffin, the umbrella kniffin puts allof its canes up at the top, or the first year

growth that's going to fruit. What we're talking about with cane growthhere is one yearold growth that has a chocolate brown color, and nice smooth bark with budson it. We're going to be saving four canes, plus the permanent trunk, to give us all ofour fruiting structure. Everything else is going to be coming off of here, and that includesanything that fruited last year. You can tell the two yearold canes, or thecanes that fruited last year, because they'll be thicker, and they'll have gray, peelingbark. All of these are going to come off, and we're going to save the one yearold canewith the chocolate brown color, and the smooth

bark. The first step in pruning is to look at ourpermanent trunk and remove all of the two yearold growth, the growth that fruited lastyear, saving a few canes that we'll be using for fruiting this year. Our first step isto cut some of these off, looking at that older bark there. We just cut that out, getit right out of there. This will open up the planting, and that twoyearold wood is not going to fruit. Unless we take it out, we'll find that our fruitingwood gets further and further away from the trunk. Part of the reason we're pruning isto keep that fruiting wood concentrated right

near the trunk. With the umbrella kniffin, which is what we'repruning to here, we're only going to maintain four of those fruiting canes. We want themall concentrated near the top of the trunk, or the top wire on our twowire trellis. We'regoing to take each of the canes that remain behind. As you can see here, here's my nicefruiting cane, smooth bark. All these are buds that are going to breakand give us long, green shoots that will have bunches of grapes on them. We're going todrape them over the top wire, and then we're going to attach them to the bottom wire, togive you that kind of quot;umbrellaquot; look, thus

the name of the system called the quot;umbrellakniffin.quot; Then we're going to cut off the ends of thecanes, so that there's only about 10 buds on each one. We just count those from thetrunk. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10. If I need to leave one ortwo on there to make it reach the bottom wire, that's fine. I'll just go to where I can attachthis to the bottom wire, like that. I need two for the other side, to completeour umbrella. You can see this leaves me with several other fruiting canes, and I need tosave some of those as well, but they don't need to be as long. What I'm calling theseare quot;renewal spurs,quot; because we need the buds

from these shoots to come out and give uscane that we'll be able to put up on the wire next year. For every fruiting cane that I'm leaving behind,I also need to cut some renewal cane, or renewal spurs, to provide us with fruiting wood fornext year. I just cut these back to one or two buds, and if they're not where I wantthem I can cut them off completely. But for every fruiting cane, I need to leave at leastone renewal spur. I tend to leave a couple of extra renewalspurs here in Maine, because I'm very sensitive to the fact that I'm likely to get winterinjury almost every year.

How to Prune Grapes Summer

Hi, I'm Tricia, a California organic gardener and today we're going to talk about summer maintenance for your table grapes we've had an extremely wet season thisyear and my table grapes have gone bonkers I'm growing four different types of tablegrapes here and there's a lot of vegetative growth making for a very densecanopy over the grape vines earlier in the spring, the shoots were thinned when they were about six to twelve inches long you should have about six to eightshoots per foot of canopy at the same time as thinning the shoots, I also cut the suckers off at the trunk

and i'm going to continue to trim these suckers throughout the season, as necessary you see there's not enough sunlight getting into this little fruit clusters the sunlight is what helps improve theflavor and the quality of the fruit by having so much foliage around thecluster, I'm also at risk for disease the first step is to take these long shoots and tuck them into the trellising and keep them out of the fruiting zone that helped a lot but you can see there'sstill a lot of hanging vines I'm going to trim back this shoot that has no clusters on it

if you're going to trim back a shoot that has clusters, be sure and leave about 1517 fullsized leaves before you make your cut cut as little as possible and try to cut atthe point where the leaves are half the size of the mature leaves these smaller leaves haven't startedproducing food yet so the vine won't miss them as much asit would miss these larger food producing leaves the grape vines are looking a lot better the cutting is going to stimulate the growth so you don't want to do this too late in the season if the fruit is just beginning to ripen,it's too late to cut

now that I've tamed the vines, it's time to thin the fruit cluster thin when the fruit has just setand before it gets too big for goodsized table grapes leave onecluster per shoot in order to improve the size of thegrapes, snip off the very bottom of the cluster I'm happy to have completed my summermaintenence on my table grape vines now I look forward to grape jam, grape jelly,grape juice, and those frozen grape treats so enjoy your grape vines and Grow Organic for Life!.

Ordering Grape Vines from Harvest Express Planting

all right so we finally got our vinesin we ordered them from harvest express dot com they come in bundles of 15 we've got 3 bundles for 44 plants. We'll have one extra and we'll figure out what to do with that later. This is the box it came in. All forty five vines are in this little box. Next day shipping was really nice. So lets open it up and see we've got in there Alright, so inside the bag

we've got all forty five vines and they come in bundles of fifteen as you can see here this is how they come, just little cuttings we'll be planting these in the rows today. Also coming with the vines careful not to break them are little covers for them, these will help keep them moist new plantings come out of thefreezer and they tend to be very susceptible to dehydration so these will help keep the

soil moist until the roots get established and all the irrigation gets sorted out all that kinda stuff press it in about two inches deep and there you go the little guy's right in there so we've got all the plants planted and in the groundall forty four of them got sleeves on, they're wet uh. only thing that's left to do nowis change the irrigation a little bit so

the new vines can get plenty of water uh. we'll be dooing that next but uh. it'll be a few months before we get anygood growth on there so we'll check back as soon as we've got something to show. Sp for wine at home dot tv, I will talk to you later.

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