Crimson Seedless Grape Plants

Serving Growing Ohios Grape and Wine Industry

Last January, January 6ththe official day of the polar vortex we experienced really damaging temperatures.Anywhere from around twenty below zero to about sixteen below zerowhere it killed the fruiting buds and it killed actual grape vines.And we've never experienced any damage like this before.And we've never we really didn't know the extentof the damage on the vines until April May in that time frame when we didn't see anybuds developing and even some of thetrunks cracked.

But the impact of that was dramaticwe have no crop at all in our vinifera and we grow varieties like Chardonnay, PinotNoir, Cabernet Franc, Rieslingand without any grapes, we were forced to buya lot of grapes. But it's had a huge impactas far as the grape production not to mention the actual wine losswhich is two or three years spanning. Because in some of the vineyardsthat will have to be replaced from the ground up

with new vines we will not get the first crop is three to four years out.So the impact is just dramatic and millions and millions of dollars.Actually in the viticulture program at Ohio Stateone of our focus of the research is cold hardiness of grapes.So really that's one of my expertise in this fieldof learning more about how grapes cope with freezing with cold in general.After this cold event our growers really needed a lot of help in terms of how to not onlyassess

the damage but also how to deal with the vinesthat are damaged. And we conducted a lot of workshops just toshow them how to prune the vines. Our relationship with Ohio State goes wayback in the 1980'sWe've had a long standing relationship with ongoing research in the wineryand in the vineyards. Currently with Imed Damiour research stems lately from the cold winter vortexwhere we've had a lot of the vines killed and damagedfrom the minus twenty degree temperatures.

Current research is kind of involved tothe extent of the damage to determine the actual damage andto have pruning studies done to see what was the best way to prunethese injured vines. We have not had temperatures that coldsince 1994 here and myself and a lot of the grape growershave not experienced this cold damage. So we need research to help uskind of figure out what's the next step and see what our future is in these vineyards.

How Can There Be Seedless Grapes

Hi, I'm Josh Clark. And I'm wondering have youever been to a grocery store, picked up some seedlessgrapes, eaten them, and then just stopped dead inyour tracks and thought, wait a minute, how can somethingthat needs seeds to reproduce be seedless. These grapesshouldn't even exist.

I mean, yes these seedlessgrapes can be here. But what about its childrené I'm here to answer thisexistential question for you. It turns out that mostof the fruit we eat are clones of other fruit. Most fruits is propagatedincluding seedless grapes, through cuttings. So they don't needto have seeds.

Rather than following thetraditional angiosperm method of reproduction, whichmeans producing seeds, and fruit to cover those things. So to produce a newbunch of seedless grapes, a whole new plant, you take acutting from an existing vine. You dip that cuttingin rooting hormone. And you put that cutting in alittle bit of nice warm soil. A little moisture andyou've got a new vine

that's going to producemore seedless grapes. They never have to produceseeds because they never have to reproduce. But where do the seedlessgrapes come from to begin withé Turns out somewherealong the line, somebody noticed some grapesthat didn't produce seeds well. And said, hey, thisis a genetic defect that I could really cash in on.

Let me just keeppropagating this one grape. So all the seedless grapestoday are descendants of clones of that originalfreak of nature seedless grape. Which you can thank the guywho figured that one out. And one last thing, theseedless grapes you eat actually do have seeds in them. They have thebeginning of seeds that due to that genetic mutationwe talked about, never

form the hard outershell, which means you never choke on a grape seed. You can thank that guy, whoeverhis name is, he was a good guy. If you like thistutorial, you're going to love all the tutorialson this YouTube channel. You can go ahead and subscribe. Maybe leave a nicelittle comment and just watchtutorials all day long.

Neptune Grape

Guitar Playing This is Neptune seedless table grape. A 1999 release from the Division of AgricultureFruit Breeding Program. Neptune is one of the last of our Planet Series. Neptune has beautiful large clusters Ripens late in August Toward the end of our grape season in Arkansas. It has a fruity flavor, one that many peoplelike.

Something different from what you find inthe grocery store. It has fruit cracking resistance, a good yield An eye catcher, one to consider particularlyfor local marketing. Guitar Playing.

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