Bluebell Grapes For Sale

Growing Grapes

Hi, I'm Tricia, and organic gardener. Grapes are a beautiful edible landscapeplant, as well as producing delicious fruit. Today I'm going to plant a new grapevine. If you're not ready to plant your grapesas soon as they arrive, that's ok, you can heel them in. You can either dig a shallow trench, put the grape vines in and cover the roots with soil, or you can do like I've done and put the roots in a bucket, cover them with soil and protect themwith a little bit of straw.

Grapes are tolerant of a wide variety of soils, but it is important to check with your Master Gardener or local ag extension to find out what varieties will do best in your climate. Your site selection should be in fullsun with a southern exposure, away from trees. And avoid depressions where cool air can collect. Ideally, preparation for planting yourgrapes will start the year before with a soil test and an appropriate cover crop. Grapes like moderate fertilityand a pH of about 5.5 7. In most climates you can plant grapes in late winter or early spring.

For northern climates you might want towait until a little bit later in the spring. Just dig a hole the same size as theroots and don't add any fertilizer. You don't want to get more leaves than fruit! Soak the roots of your grapevine forabout 2 to 3 hours before planting, and then you can prune off any damaged roots. But it's important to leave as much of the root system as possible. Make sure that the roots are loose andnot clumped together. The hole should be deep enough to plantthe vine to the same level it was planted before,

with a few inches of soilover the longest roots. Gently back fill the soil with thetopsoil first. And if it hasn't rained recently make sure and give your plant some water. You want to train your newly plantedlittle grapevine to grow into a big grapevine with a straight single trunk reaching the trellis. In order to do that we're going to prune this plant so that it has one straightish cane. By the second year you need some kind of a support system. This two wire support system is very common and easy to build.

To train your grapevine to grow straight upto the trellising, you may need to do a temporary supportlike bamboo and then just tie it togetherwith a little twine or some tape. These are flame grapes, so I'll betraining them to a bilateral cordon. That is I want a nice straight trunk. And then I'll choose two buds that will be trained into big, permanent branches on either side of the trunk. It's really important to tag your plants.I use these permanent zinc plant tags

its really important to know what variety you have so that you can prune appropriately. Whether you have a big vineyard or you'vejust planted a few grape vines, grapes will benefit from cover cropping. So get ready for winter pruning,and Grow Organic for Life!.

Prairie Yard Garden Northern Fruits

(slow piano music) Prairie Yard and Garden is a production of The University of Minnesota Morris, in cooperation with Pioneer Public Television. Closed captioning is provided by Mark and Margaret YackelJuleen, in honor of ShalomHill Farm, a nonprofit rural education retreat center,

in a beautiful prairie setting near Windom in southwestern Minnesota. Shalom Hill Farm, shalomhill . Fall is the time to harvest those fruits that we have watched grow all summer. We have many choices to choose from thanks to the horticultural breeding program at the University of Minnesota.

Join me on Prairie Yard and Garden, as we learn about some of those Minnesota developed varieties of fruits. (soft jazz music) Minnesota has many fruits that do very well in our northern climate. Today, my guest, Peter Moe, Director of Operations at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, is gonna tell us about some of the varieties

that have beendeveloped over the years here in Minnesota. Welcome to the show Peter. Hi Larry, I'm glad to be here. Good, well we got a long history of developing primarily apples, I think, is the most wellknown. That's right, theUniversity of Minnesota started apple breeding here in 1908.

And so it's over 100 years. And of course the first big success was the Haralson apple. They found and apple seedling, of course they were crossing apples from Russia and Canada, the coldest parts of the world, and growing the seedlings here. And the winter of 191718 was very cold.

The following spring there was a tree that was full of flowers, had a good crop, and about five years later that was named the Haralson apple. Larry And wheredoes Haralson come fromé Was that an individual breederé Peter It was actually named after the first Superintendent of the, it was then call the

Cute Bunny Jumping Competition

TINA LARSEN: My nameis Tina Larsen. I'm from Bollungen, Sweden. And this is my rabbit, Flora. We're at Harrogate'sEvent Center. Is that the name of ité Me and Flora is doingrabbit show jumping.

She really enjoys herselfwhen she's jumping. I look at her, and I seehow fun she has. I don't think she careabout the trophy. But I think she be interestedin beating Cherie. MAGDALENA: This is Cherie. She's two and a halfyears old, and she really loves jumping. ANNOUNCER: And she's off.

Oh, she's quick. MAGDALENA: See's a veryhappy rabbit. She's very fun. She lives in my house. When I'm open my fridge, she'scoming, oh, do you have something for meé She loves carrots and hay andordinary rabbit food. I don't know if shewants to win.

I think she think it's funto jump, and that's why she doing it. MAX'S TRAINER: Max's fullname is Maximilian. Max has been trainingfor a month. Very hyper, very enthusiastic. Not too sure what he'sdoing all the time. He still really, reallytries hard.

Max is the youngest bunny in thecompetition at the moment, at six months old. And everyone loves him 'causehis little ears go up and down as he jumps. ANNOUNCER: Just under 10 rabbitswith us today who will tackle the 10jump course. Stalwarts readyé

Three, two, one, go. Whoo! Let's cheer her on. She's halfway throughINAUDIBLE make it to the end.

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